The Quick and Easy Guide to German and EU Intellectual Property Law, Trademarks and Copyright
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Mars bars don’t look that special

The Court of First Instance had to decide about the distinctive qualities of the Mars bar shape.

Mars Inc had registered a three-dimensional Community trade mark, Nice Classes 5, 29 and 30 of the Nice Agreement.

The German chocolate manufacturer Ludwig Schokolade filed an application for a declaration that this mark was invalid. This application was rejected by OHIM’s Cancellation Division, however Ludwig Schokolade’s appeal filed against this decision was successful. Accordingly Mars’ trademark was declared invalid. The Court of First Instance confirmed this decision and dismissed the action brought forward by Mars Inc based on the following key findings:

An elongated shape with rounded ends is not significantly different from other shapes commonly used for chocolate bars. Chevrons on top of a Mars bar are decorative elements and not a sign indicating the product’s commercial origin.

A mark can only be registered on the grounds of distinctiveness in consequence of the use which has been made of it, if this distinctiveness has been acquired in each of the states being a Member State at the time registration was sought.

The amount of time alone, a sign has been used in certain Member States is not sufficient to show that the public targeted by the product perceives it as an indication of commercial origin.

(Court of First Instance, T‑28/08, 8 July 2009)

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July 14, 2009   No Comments

Procter & Gamble’s OLAY no likelihood of confusion with OLI

In this decision the Court of First Instance had to decide the case of the Spanish company Laboratorios Alcala Farma who had filed an application for a Community trade mark in regards to the figurative sign “Oli” for the Nice Classes 3 and 5.

Procter & Gamble had filed an opposition claiming infringement of their earlier “OLAY” Community word marks (Nice Classes 3 and 5) because of a likelihood of confusion.

The court dismissed Procter & Gamble’s action. In essence because “…the signs at issue have significant differences at a visual and aural level which override the similarities…” in parts because of the figurative, highly stylised appearance of the “Oli” sign. But also the difference in pronunciation was highlighted by the court.

Finally the court emphasises that in regards to medical goods there was no likelihood of confusion as consumers display a higher level of attention when purchasing such goods.

No real groundbreaking new legal developments here.

(European Court of First Instance T‑240/08, 8 Jul 2009)

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July 10, 2009   1 Comment

The OHIM and Dr. No

In the Case T‑435/05 decided by the European Court of First Instance on the 30th June 2009, Danjaq LLC, a US company established in Santa Monica, California was objecting the registration of the word sign “Dr. No” as Community trade mark at the OHIM by the German company Mission Productions Gesellschaft für Film-, Fernseh- und Veranstaltungsproduktion mbH (in the following referred to as “Mission Production”).

Registration was sought for Nice Classes 9, 12, 18, 25 and 32.

The OHIM rejected Danjaq´s objection on the grounds that

  • they had not provided sufficient proof that the marks in question had a well‑known character or
  • that the non‑registered marks or the signs other than trade marks had previously been used in the course of trade.

Danjaq LLC based their legal action on the following grounds:

  1. Infringement of Article 8(1)(a) and (b) and (2)(c) of Regulation No 40/94 (identity and likelihood of confusion)
  2. Infringement of Article 73 of Regulation No 40/94, and of Rules 50(2)(f) and 52(1) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 2868/95 (OHIM’s obligation to state reasons on which a decision is based).
  3. Infringement of Article 8(4) of Regulation No 40/94 (proprietor of non-registered trademark’s right to prohibit use of subsequent trademark)

The court has declined all three pleas.

1. The court ruled that there was no infringement of Article 8(1)(a) and (b) and (2)(c) of Regulation No 40/94 as the signs “Dr. No” and “Dr. NO” were not used by Danjaq LLC as trade marks previously. The court considers “Dr. No” as the title of the first film in the “James Bond” series and the name of one of the main character in that film. The signs “Dr. No” and “Dr. NO” were however not used as trade marks in order to identify the commercial origin of the films or DVDs.

For the average consumer, these signs only help to distinguish that film from other films in the “James Bond” series. The commercial origin of the film is indicated by other signs (e.g. “007″, “James Bond” or the “Gun Symbol”).

The court further reasons that even the commercial success of the Bond film “Dr No” can not change the fact that the signs in questions are not being used as indicators of commercial origin.

2. The court ruled that there was no infringement of Article 73 of Regulation No 40/94 and of Rules 50(2)(f) and 52(1) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 2868/95 as Danjaq LLC had failed to prove that it had used the signs “Dr. No” and “Dr. NO” in the course of trade. This is sufficient ground on which OHIM could reject the plea without violating Article 73 of Regulation No 40/94 and of Rules 50(2)(f) and 52(1) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 2868/95.

3. Finally the court ruled that there was no infringement of Article 8(4) of Regulation No 40/94 as Danjaq LLC had failed to prove that it had used the signs “Dr. No” and “Dr. NO” in the course of trade. Pursuant to Article 8(4) of Regulation No 40/94, the existence of an earlier non‑registered trade mark or a sign other than a trade mark gives its proprietor the right to prohibit the use of a subsequent trade mark if the sign

- is used in the course of trade and
- is of more than mere local significance.

The court reasons that “…the condition requiring use in the course of trade is a fundamental requirement, without which the sign in question cannot enjoy any protection against the registration of a Community trade mark, irrespective of the requirements to be met under national law in order to acquire exclusive rights…”

The documents submitted by Danjaq LLC were not sufficient proof that the film title “Dr No” was used in the course of trade as Danjaq LLC did not specify the extent of use of the title in the markets concerned. The court would have regarded “… programming details of the film, either for cinemas or television, or to specify the length of time over which the film was distributed …” as sufficient proof.

(European Court of First Instance T‑435/05, 30 June 2009)

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July 6, 2009   No Comments

Wordmark “CK” – Calvin Klein vs. Creationes Kennya

There is no similarity or likelihood of confusion between the trademark “ck creationes kennya” and the older community trademark “ck calvin klein”.

Pursuant to Art. 8 Para. 1 lit. b Council Regulation(EC) No. 40/94 a trademark can not be registered if

  • the proprietor of an older trademark objects and
  • the new mark is identical or similar to the older trademark and
  • the trademarks are related to identical or similar goods or services and
  • this causes a likelihood of confusion within the relevant public circles.

When comparing compound trademarks, it is not sufficient to compare components separately. In fact it is required to compare the trademarks in their entireness.

The mere similarity between the dominating element “ck” of the older trademark “ck calvin klein” (being registered in a way where “ck” is printed in significantly bigger fonts than “calvin klein”)  and the element “ck” of “ck creaciones kennya” does not cause a likelihood of confusion as the latter is dominated by “creaciones kennya” and not by “ck”.

European Court of First Instance (T-185/07, 7th May 2009)

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June 15, 2009   No Comments

“Budweiser” not as Community Trademark registrable

The European Court of First Instance has ruled, the by Czech Brewer Budějovický Budvar, národní podnik (Budvar Brewery) registered international trademark “BUDWEISER” (protected territory: BeNeLux-Countries, Germany, Austria and Italy) is an earlier trademark as per Art. 8 Para. 1 (a) and (b) Council Regulation (EC) No 40/94. Therefore American Brewer Anheuser-Busch can not register the term “BUDWEISER” as Community Trademark.

Print ads featuring pictures of the earlier trademark may be considered proof that the earlier Trademark has been put to genuine use as per Art. 43 Para. 1 and 2 Council Regulation (EC) No 40/94.

European Court of First Instance, T-191/07, 25. March 2009

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May 20, 2009   1 Comment